Thursday, August 28, 2014

Presentation on "Oberlin, Hotbed of Abolitionism," September 29




J. Brent Morris, Assistant Professor of History at the University of South Carolina Beaufort, will speak about Oberlin and the antislavery movement on Monday, September 29, in the Moffett Auditorium, Room 050, in the Mudd Center at 4:30 p.m. His talk entitled “Be Not Conformed to This World: Oberlin and the Antebellum Fight for Freedom and Equality” is based on his new book Oberlin, Hotbed of Abolitionism: College, Community, and the Fight for Freedom and Equality in Antebellum America. 
There will be a book signing following the talk in the lower level of the Mudd Center near the Moffett Auditorium.

The talk is sponsored by the Friends of the Library, the Oberlin College Archives, the Oberlin College History Department, the Oberlin Heritage Center, and the Oberlin African American Genealogy and Research Group. The event is free and open to the public.


Friday, June 27, 2014

Photo of John Mercer Langston Returns from Exhibitions



John Mercer Langston
Oberlin College Archives

Our photographic portrait of John Mercer Langston (1829-1897), taken around 1880, returned home after its inclusion in a major exhibition organized by the National Gallery of Art. Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial showcased Oberlin College's photograph of Langston from September 15, 2013 to January 20, 2014. After that the show traveled to the Massachusetts Historical Society where it was on exhibit from February 23 to May 26, 2014. 

John Mercer Langston was a graduate of the Oberlin Collegiate Institute in 1849, and of Oberlin's Graduate School of Theology in 1853. He practiced law in Oberlin beginning shortly after his seminary graduation. He was the recruiting officer in the West for the famous 54th Massachusetts regiment of black troops, and also for the 55th Massachusetts, hence the portrait's inclusion in the National Gallery of Art's exhibition. 

To learn more about Langston's illustrious career and to see a photograph taken during his student years at Oberlin, see Oberlin and the Civil War.



Friday, May 30, 2014

Welcome to the 2014 Frederick B. Artz Scholars

On June 9 we welcome our first of two Artz scholars in 2014, James Lin. The Artz research program, made possible by a grant from the Oberlin Historical and Improvement Organization, is intended to encourage and facilitate the publication of scholarly, humanistic studies based on archival and special collection sources at Oberlin College.  

James Lin is a doctoral student at the University of California, Berkeley. His research topic is titled "Sowing Seeds and Knowledge: International Agricultural Development in the U.S., China, Taiwan, and the World, 1920 to 1975." He will be with us from June 9-13.

Our other Artz scholar this year is John Bell, from Harvard University.  He will be with us from June 23 to July 2. His topic is titled "A College Upon a Hill: Campuses of American Social Reform, 1830-1880."

Monday, May 19, 2014

Reunion Exhibits May 19-25


 Exhibits Celebrating the Classes of 1964 and 1989
and the 
175th Anniversary of the Oberlin Alumni Association
May 19-25

Come see our exhibits and yearbooks, the Oberlin Review, 
Oberlin Alumni Magazine and other materials available 
for you to browse and reminisce.

Monday-Friday, 10-12 and 1-4:30
Saturday 10-2
Sunday 1-4



Thursday, April 10, 2014

New Acquisitions Exhibit, April-May 2014


See the latest additions to the holdings of the Oberlin College Archives in our current exhibit. My personal favorite of these is the rubbing from a Chinese monument at the Beilin Museum at Xi'an, China, purchased by the late Paul Arnold, former Professor of Art at Oberlin. Other objects on display include a bamboo cane, letter sweaters, an 1856 handbill advertising a sale of land and slaves in Kentucky, an album of early postcards of Oberlin, etchings of Oberlin buildings by Julia Gridley Severance, and a scrapbook made by a 1943 Oberlin College graduate.

This exhibit will be on view in April and May of 2014 in the Goodrich Room, 420 Mudd.





Monday, February 10, 2014

Celebrating Black History Month, February 2014



Winter term 1980 students march into Oberlin at the end of their four-hundred-mile journey retracing the Underground Railroad. Their thirty-day trip took them from Greensburg, Kentucky to Oberlin, Ohio. The nation's media, both print and broadcast, widely reported on this NEH-sponsored project.

Celebrating Black History Month, February 2014

An Exhibit in the Goodrich Room, Mudd Center, Fourth Floor
In 1935, Oberlin College dedicated a plaque in the Carnegie Library building to commemorate 100 years of black education at Oberlin. That plaque is located on the wall outside Azariah’s Café in the Academic Commons of the Mudd Center. Today we celebrate over 179 years of African American Heritage at Oberlin.
Featured in the exhibit are photographs and documents from the collections of the Oberlin College Archives. The exhibit provides a brief glimpse into the history of African American Heritage at Oberlin including the entry in the minutes of the January 1, 1835 meeting of Board of Trustees of the Oberlin Collegiate Institute: "Whereas information has been received from Rev. John J. Shipherd, expressing a wish that students may be received in the Institution irrespective of color…"
        
We invite you to visit our website (www.oberlin.edu/archive) or see our staff to learn more about the holdings of the Oberlin College Archives, specifically those related to the history of African American Heritage at Oberlin. See also our Oberlin and Civil Rights Digital Collection.

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Students work with archival materials for History 213


Professor Lasser (left) and Ken Grossi (right) presenting in the Archives and Special Collections Forsythe classroom, 4th floor Mudd Center.


Students in First Wave Feminisms examine historical materials for their project.

In Spring semester 2013, Carol Lasser, Professor of History, and Ken Grossi, Oberlin College Archivist, developed a research project for students in History 213, First Wave American Feminism. The students worked in teams to collectively write an introductory essay, and each individual transcribed, introduced and annotated a single historical document. The results were astounding, both in terms of the quality of the projects, and in the engagement of students with the work. Professor Lasser encouraged her students to document their achievement by making their materials, often drawn from little-used collections, more broadly available to a wider world via the Archives website. Lasser and Jennifer Graham (OC 2013), Associate Editor, reviewed and edited the student projects that are now available at http://www.oberlin.edu/archive/teaching/projects/hist213.html.

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Monday evening hours during fall semester

Archives and Special Collections will hold evening hours when classes are in session during the fall semester on Mondays from 5:30 to 9 p.m. We will not be open Monday evening on October 21 (fall break) or after classes end on December 12.

If you want to contact us before then to arrange to see materials, please use our contact form at http://www.oberlin.edu/archive/contact/index.html.


Thursday, July 18, 2013

1870 Drawing of Leech Lake, MN returned from the Intermuseum Conservation Association




This pencil drawing by Anna Jane Wright, OC 1872, daughter of missionary Sela G. Wright, documents the appearance of the Leech Lake, Minnesota settlement among the Ojibwe in 1870.  The drawing had been mounted poorly in a wooden frame, and with the Hunt Preservation Fund, Archives was able to send it to the Intermuseum Conservation Association for treatment. ICA conservators repaired a long tear on the left side, and mounted the drawing in a presentation mat for stability and for attractive display. For the Ojibwe dictionary notes compiled by Sela G. Wright residing in his papers at the Archives, see http://www.oberlin.edu/library/digital/sela/.

Photography by John Seyfried for the ICA

Tuesday, July 2, 2013

Antislavery at Oberlin Exhibit, June-July 2013



We have a special exhibit of archival materials on display, "Oberlin, Anti-slavery Activity, and the Coming of the Civil War." The exhibit is up in the Goodrich Room now through the end of July.  Among the items featured are the Bible used by the Oberlin-Wellington Rescuers while they were in jail, early photographs of Oberlin abolitionists, original letters, rifle bullets from a battlefield where Oberlin Union soldiers fought Confederates, and publications on the topic.